Second Hello world!

Second Hello world!


The first issue of Middle East Economic Digest (MEED) was published on 8 March 1957. MEED’s founder and driving force for the next two decades was Elizabeth Collard, a champion of Arab causes who was to become an adviser to UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson on Middle East affairs and a friend of Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt and King Hussein of Jordan. She also helped to establish the Council for the Advancement of Arab British Understanding (CAABU).[14] With two part-time secretarial assistants, MEED was produced on a hand-cranked Ronco printing machine. Every Friday evening, friends and relatives would help staple and stuff envelopes with the 12-page newsletter. Lacking any editorial resources, the Middle East Economic Digest was a compilation from newspapers and other reports. Newspapers were flown in weekly from Cairo and Beirut, translated and condensed. By the time MEED was acquired by Emap in 1986 it had a staff of 20 full-time journalists and 12 researchers and newsroom assistants to cover Middle Eastern business and project news. In 2006 Emap Middle East also acquired business website AME Info. In December 2007, it was announced that Emap had agreed to sell its business-to-business titles including MEED to a consortium comprising private equity group Apax and the Guardian Media Group.[15] The first issue of Middle East Economic Digest (MEED) was published on 8 March 1957. MEED’s founder and driving force for the next two decades was Elizabeth Collard, a champion of Arab causes who was to become an adviser to UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson on Middle East affairs and a friend of Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt and King Hussein of Jordan. She also helped to establish the Council for the Advancement of Arab British Understanding (CAABU).[14] With two part-time secretarial assistants, MEED was produced on a hand-cranked Ronco printing machine. Every Friday evening, friends and relatives would help staple and stuff envelopes with the 12-page newsletter. Lacking any editorial resources, the Middle East Economic Digest was a compilation from newspapers and other reports. Newspapers were flown in weekly from Cairo and Beirut, translated and condensed. By the time MEED was acquired by Emap in 1986 it had a staff of 20 full-time journalists and 12 researchers and newsroom assistants to cover Middle Eastern business and project news. In 2006 Emap Middle East also acquired business website AME Info. In December 2007, it was announced that Emap had agreed to sell its business-to-business titles including MEED to a consortium comprising private equity group Apax and the Guardian Media Group.[15]

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